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Recently I, along with a group of friends, finished a Tuff Scrambler 5K Adventure Run. This race was an obstacle run, where we had to climb, jump, run, crawl and even swim through 3.1 miles of trails and obstacles. For some, it was their first 5K. For all of us, it was an adventure in our running skills.

Have you ever thought about competing in one of these events?


 
 
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As runners, we often measure ourselves based on our goals; goals that may include time, distance or pace. We set these goals to push ourselves to run farther and/or faster and when we achieve our goals we are elated. However, when we may not reach our goal we should still find reasons to celebrate.

On September 8th I finished my first half marathon; that achievement alone is reason to celebrate. I have been training with my long-time friend and now running buddy, John Jankowski since July to up our running distance from a 10K to a half marathon. Throughout all the training I set my goal to finish the race in 2 hours and 30 minutes. When I crossed the finish line, my time was 2:36:40, six minutes and 40 seconds beyond my goal.


 
 
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If you run long enough, at some point you are going to hit a rut. That rut could be a lack in training progress, inability to achieve a new personal best, or even the lack of desire to run. Regardless of the reason behind your rut, how do you get out of it?

As they often say, the only difference between a rut and a grave is that the ends of a rut allow you to climb out. As runners, there are options that we have that will allow us to get motivated to start running once again. Here are some things you can do to help get out of a training rut.